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Mx Gazetteer for England

All contributed landmark postings are shown below. Selecting a country from the list will display all landmarks for that country. Selecting the Landmark Name will display a full page of information including an interactive map and possibly additional information. If you find one we have missed (and there are many) drop an email to our webmaster with a picture and description.

Croxteth Hall

Croxteth Park, Liverpool, England
Contributed by: Shirley Grey   |   22 Aug 2017


 

Molineux Avenue

Staveley,Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Contributed by: AU019 Brian Seddon   |   09 May 2015

Molineux Avenue was named after the Reverend Charles Hurlock Molineux, Rector of Staveley for 39 years from 1888 to 1927.  He was born 1842 at Lewes, Sussex, the son of George Molineux, a banker, and his wife Maria Ann Hurlock. He originally studied law and was admitted a member of the Incorporated Law Society in 1865. Quitting the legal profession, he entered Lichfield Theological College, was ordained Priest in 1870 and appointed Curate at St Michael's, Derby. He died at Staveley in 1927.

A stained glass window of four lights was erected in the south aisle of Staveley Parish Church in his memory. (Design for a stained glass window © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.)


 

Molineux Hotel

Wolverhampton, England
Contributed by: US297 Christina Mollineaux Witcher   |   07 Dec 2014

The building was first built around 1720, possibly by its first recorded owner, John Rotton. The house and 8 acres of land were acquired in 1744 by Benjamin Molineux, a rich ironmaster and banker.  It was then just on the outskirts of the built up area and is a typical example of what the new rich of Wolverhampton were providing for themselves at a time when they still lived in the town centre. At the front it had a good view to St. Peter's church; at the back it had fine views of what was then considered to be some of the best and most picturesque countryside in England, with the views extending into Wales.  It had extensive walled gardens running down the hill to where the Molineux football ground now is. Benjamin Molineux and his family greatly extended the building and the rear elevation and return are, if anything, richer than the front with two elaborate venetian windows. The interior was once splendid, noted particularly for its fine central staircase, wood panelled rooms and fine plasterwork.


 

Molineux House

Wolverhampton, England
Contributed by: US329 Jim Molineux   |   08 Nov 2014

Molineux House originates from Benjamin Molineux, a successful local merchant who, in 1744, purchased land on which he built Molineux House. The estate was purchased in 1860 by O.E. McGregor, who converted the land into a pleasure park open to the public. Molineux Grounds, as it was titled, included a wide range of facilities including an ice rink, a cycling track, a boating lake and, most crucially, an area for football.

Richard and Hannah's son John, born in 1675 settled in Wolverhampton during the early years of the 18th century, and married Mary. They had five sons and three daughters. John became an ironmonger, supplying manufacturers with their raw materials, then selling their finished goods. He became an extremely successful and wealthy businessman. He began by selling Black Country hardware such as brass and iron in Dublin, then returned to Wolverhampton and set himself up as an ironmaster in Horseley Fields, where he had two houses with workshops at the back.

John and Mary’s fifth and youngest son, Benjamin, became an ironmonger like his father, and ran his uncle Daniel’s warehouse in Dublin, where he stored and sold all kinds of goods such as locks, hinges, tools, and saddler’s goods. He also sold Birmingham-made steel toys. At the time, the trade between Britain and the West Indies had greatly increased, and so Benjamin exported many of his goods to that region. He also imported Jamaica rum, and in 1775 opened a Jamaica rum warehouse in Wolverhampton, where he also became a banker. He invested in the local canals, and made many astute loans, becoming one of the most successful businessmen in the area.

See also Other Famous Homes of the Molyneux Family by David L. Molyneux, MxWorld, Volume IX No. 3, February 1995, pp. 19-21.


 

Molineux Stadium

Wolverhampton, England
Contributed by: US329 Jim Molineux   |   08 Nov 2014

The stadium is located a few hundred yards north of Wolverhampton city centre, at the far side of the city's ring road, and is a prominent building due to its size in an area with predominantly low-rise buildings. It consists of four stands: the Steve Bul Stand (formerly the John Ireland stand), the Jack Harris Stand, the Stan Cullis Stand and the Billy Wright Stand. Both the Billy Wright and Stan Cullis stands feature statues of each man in front of them.

The total seated capacity of the stands is approximately 31,500, with a temporary seating area lifting the present official capacity to 31,700. The current stadium design stems from the early 1990s when it was extensively redeveloped to become a modern all-seater venue in accordance with required British football stadia to provide seating for all those attending.

The stadium's Molineux name originates from Benjamin Molineux, a successful local merchant who, in 1744, purchased land on which he built Molineux House on which the stadium would eventually be built. The estate was purchased in 1860 by O.E. McGregor, who converted the land into a pleasure park open to the public. Molineux Grounds, as it was titled, included a wide range of facilities including an ice rink, a cycling track, a boating lake and, most crucially, an area for football.

The grounds were sold to the Northampton Brewery in 1889, who rented its use to the Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C., who had previously played at Dudley Road. After renovating the site, the first ever league game was staged on 7 September 1889.

Wolves bought the freehold in 1923 for £5,607 and soon set about constructing a major grandstand on the Waterloo Road side (designed by Archibald Leitch. In 1932, the club also built a new stand on the Molineux Street side and followed this with adding a roof to the South Bank two years later. The stadium finally now had four stands, which formed Molineux for the next half century. In 1953, the club became one of the first to install floodlights, at a cost of around £10,000. The first ever floodlit game was held on 30 September 1953, as Wolves won 3–1 against South Africa. The referee for this match was Mr F Read of Willenhall. The addition of the floodlights opened the door for Molineux to host a series of midweek friendlies against teams from across the globe. In the days prior to the formation of the European Cup and international club competitions, these games were highly prestigious and gained huge crowds and interest, the BBC often televising such events. A new taller set was later installed in 1957, at a cost of £25,000, as the stadium prepared to host its first European Cup games.

The newly renovated stadium was officially opened on 7 December 1993, in a friendly with Honvéd, the Hungarian team who had been beaten in one of Molineux's most famous original floodlit friendlies. Molineux, with an all-seated capacity of 28,525, was then one of the largest stadiums in England, although this figure has since been exceeded by other new or revamped stadia.


 

Molineux Street

Derby, England
Contributed by: US329 Jim Molineux   |   14 Dec 2014

No historical information yet.


 

Molyneux Drive

London SW17, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   21 Aug 2014

The history is unknown. If you know the history of this landmark please help us by emailing to webmaster@mx-world.org


 

Molyneux Guest House

Waterloo Place, The Esplanade, Weymouth, Dorset DT4 7PD, England
Contributed by: UK006 Clive Molyneux   |   20 May 2015

Welcome to The Molyneux Guest House Bed and Breakfast on Weymouth Seafront. Whether you’re planning a short break, overnight stay or a longer holiday you’ll find the Molyneux Guest House an ideal place to stay. Located on Weymouth Esplanade within easy reach of Weymouth’s attractions, harbourside and town centre we offer well furnished, comfortable rooms with en suite facilities in our friendly family run bed and breakfast establishment. Our website is here to help you plan your visit so please take a look around and feel free to contact us if there is anything else you need to know.

Weymouth is a perfect place for a short break or family holiday with plenty of events, attractions and beautiful scenery to enjoy.


 

Molyneux House

10 Molyneux Street, Marylebone, London
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight; Al Molyneux   |   12 Apr 2015

Occupant history is unknown. If you know the history of this landmark please help us by emailing to webmaster@mx-world.org

This is what Molyneux House looks like. It's in a very expensive part of London with multi-million pound properties in Molyneux Street. Marylebone is located in Westminster City. I'd love to know how the street got its name but I haven't been able to find anything so far. I think the next time I'm in London (not when I'm working) I'll be having my picture taken next this the street sign! 

Molyneux House is within The Molyneux Conservation Area which lies within the ancient parish of St. Marylebone, extending north from Oxford Street and north-east from Edgware Road. The area was generally held to derive its name from a small chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary erected on the margin of the correspondingly diminutive brook, the Tyburn, which ran its downward course from Hampstead to the Thames.

By the eighteenth century, the area had become part of the newly fashionable West End of London, with small parcels of land being developed along the north-eastern side of Edgware Road. Horwood’s map of 1794 shows a newly laid road, Queen Street (now Harrowby Street) leading into open fields, yet in a version dated twenty years later the character of the area has become overwhelmingly urban.

See additional information about Molyneux Street.

 


 

Molyneux Rose LLP

143 New Bond Street, London, W1S 2TP
Contributed by:   |   21 Aug 2017

Molyneux Rose, established in 1974, is a firm of Chartered Surveyors specialising in all aspects of commercial property. We provide a wealth of experience and have an impressive track record that sees all instructions dealt with at partner level. We pride ourselves in delivering an integrated service that deals with all our clients’ needs.


 

Molyneux Street

Marylebone, Westminster, London, England
Contributed by: Tracy Molyneux; Louis Molyneux; Al Molyneux   |   21 Aug 2014

Molyneux Street LondonTracy Molyneux posted a tip to a Moylneux St. in Marylebone, London, on one of the Mx FB pages. Street sign photo provided by Louis Molyneux. Information about the Molyneux Conservation area provided by Al Molyneux. 

Molyneux Street is part of The Molyneux Conservation Area and falls within the ancient parish of St. Marylebone, which extended north from Oxford Street and north-east from Edgware Road. The area was generally held to derive its name from a small chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary erected on the margin of the correspondingly diminutive brook, the Tyburn, which ran its downward course from Hampstead to the Thames.

Unlike areas such as Mayfair, where the simple Georgian terraces began to be replaced by more boldly modelled buildings ranging in style, as their leases expired, the Molyneux Street area escaped this shift in taste and retains most of its original nineteenth century terraces. Such narrow fronted stock brick houses area a reminder of how the surrounding redeveloped streets once looked.

The area’s street names reflect the social and intellectual aspirations of the original residents, with the names of military men and scholars scattered throughout the area, the most pertinent being Admiral Lord Molyneux Shuldham (1717?–1798).

Molyneux was born about 1717, second son of the Rev. Samuel Shuldham, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Molyneux of Ballymulvy, Co. Longford, entered the navy in 1732 as captain's servant on board the Cornwall. After holding peacetime commands in home waters, in February 1772 Molyneux succeeded John Byron as governor of Newfoundland.

On 31 March 1775 he was promoted to be rear-admiral. At the general election in the following autumn he was returned to the House of Commons as member for Fowey, and on 29 Sept. was appointed commander-in-chief on the coast of North America from the river St. Lawrence to Cape Florida. He went out with his flag in the 50-gun ship Chatham, arriving at Boston on 30 Dec. after a passage of sixty-one days, having been promoted, on 7 Dec. while on the way out, to be vice-admiral of the blue. His work was limited to covering the operations of the troops, and preventing the colonial trade. In June 1776 he was superseded by Lord Howe, and on 31 July was created a peer of Ireland by the title of Baron Shuldham. Early in 1777 he returned to England. He died in Lisbon, Portugal on September 30, 1798.

Sources: “Molyneux Street Conservation Area Audit” dated 7 August 2002; Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 52, by John Knox Laughton.

Another Molyneux of the time was Samuel Molyneux who was an MP and had links to George II. Connection unknown.


 

Mulliner Close

Bucknall, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   19 Dec 2014

Mulliner Close in Stoke-On-Trent is in the West Midlands region of England. The postcode is within the Abbey Hulton and Townsend ward/electoral division, which is in the constituency of Stoke-on-Trent Central.  Road Type is residential and its located 135.64 miles North West from the centre of London, 27.95 miles West from the centre of Derby, 31.88 miles South from the centre of Manchester, 33.87 miles East from the centre of Chester, 31.79 miles from the sea (tidal high water mark) and is 172 metres above sea level.


 

Mulliner Street

Bolton, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   19 Dec 2014

No historical information at this time. The metadata we currently have on it is as follows: Mulliner Street, just off Prospect St., Postcode: BL1 3QF or 8HF, Brownlow Fold or Astley Bridge, Bolton, Crompton Ward electoral area, Bolton District Council, Greater Manchester, North West, UK.

Its located 174.43 miles N.W. of the centre of London; 10.82 miles N.W. of the centre of Manchester; 26.21 miles N.E. of the centre of Liverpool; 33.54 miles N.E. of the centre of Chester; approx. 15.11 miles from the sea (tidal high water mark) and is 107 metres above sea level. That kind of info is all well and good, but rather dry. Based on photos its just a tiny little private alleyway. We know nothing about its history, background, and/or associations or any kind of anecdotal information about it.

Note: One distinct possibility is that it was named for one Thomas Mulliner, boot and shoe factor, Knowsley St., Quaker, former overseer of the poor for Great Bolton, and one of the originators of the Working Men's Club, d. age 50. In 1838, he was nominated as elected Alderman of the first Town Council, but declined to qualify.

Liverpool, England, Quaker Registers, 1635-1958
Name: Thomas Mulliner
Birth Date: 13 Jun 1818
Birth Location: Preston, Lancashire
Trade: Tailor
Father: John
Mother: Ann

England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975
Name: Thomas Mulliner
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 13 Jun 1818
Birth Place: Preston, Lancaster, England
Father: John Mulliner
Mother: Ann
FHL Film Number: 583997
Reference ID: 94

1851 England Census
Name: Thomas Mulliner
Age: 32
Estimated birth year: abt 1819
Relation: Head
Spouse's Name: Sarah A Mulliner
Gender: Male
Where born: Preston, Lancashire, England
Civil Parish: Little Bolton
Ecclesiastical parish: St George
Town: Little Bolton
County/Island: Lancashire
Country: England
Street address: 5 Church St.
Registration district: Bolton
Sub-registration district: Little Bolton
ED, institution, or vessel: 17
Household schedule number: 74
Piece: 2209
Folio: 481
Page Number: 17
Household Members:
Thomas Mulliner Head Md 32 Boot & Shoe Dealer Preston, Lancs
Sarah A Mulliner Wife Md 25 — Brampton, Northants
Thomas Mulliner Son S 10mos — Little Bolton, Lancs
Jane Collier Servant S 15 House Maid Standish, Lancs
Source Citation: Class: HO107; Piece: 2209; Folio: 481; Page: 17; GSU roll: 87219

1861 England Census
Name: Thomas Mulliner
Age: 42
Estimated birth year: 1819
Relation: Head
Spouse's Name: Sarah Ann Mulliner
Gender: Male
Where born: Preston, Lancashire, England
Civil Parish: Little Bolton
Ecclesiastical parish: St George
County/Island: Lancashire
Country: England
Street address: 142 St. George's Rd.
Registration district: Bolton
Sub-registration district: Little Bolton
ED, institution, or vessel: 12l
Household schedule number: 62
Piece: 2822
Folio: 72
Page Number: 12


 

Mulliner Street

Liverpool, Merseyside, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   02 Jun 2014

Mulliner Street was in the settlement of Liverpool, electoral area of Picton Ward in the administration area of Liverpool District Council located in the North West Euro Region of the UK. Its located 177.54 miles North West from the centre of London, 1.88 miles East from the centre of Liverpool, 14.5 miles North from the centre of Chester and 29.39 miles West from the centre of Manchester; and is approximately 1.63 miles from the sea (tidal high water mark, 48 metres above sea level

While researching the background for this location we ran across apiece about a pub called The Mulliner, located on this self-same Mulliner St.

The area was cleared to make room for “Archbishop Blanch”, new school building to open in 2015. The map at left shows where the old streets were situated before the redevelopment project.


 

Mulliner Street

Coventry, West Midlands, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   19 Dec 2014

Named for one Herbert Hall Mulliner, one of the founders of the nearby Coventry Ordinance Works which began its existence as Wigley-Mulliner Engineering Company Ltd. around the time of the Boer War.

A brief history in re the Coventry Ordinance Works.: Formed in July 1905 by a consortium of British shipbuilding firms John Brown 50%, Cammell Laird 25% and Fairfield 25% with the encouragement of the British government, which wanted a third major arms consortium to compete with the duopoly of Vickers Sons & Maxim and Sir W G Armstrong Whitworth & Co to drive down prices. The new company bought (as from 1 January 1905, 6 months earlier) from Cammell Laird the ordnance business established in the late 1890s by H H Mulliner and F Wigley which had been moved by them in 1902 from Birmingham to the 60 acre site in Coventry's Stoney Stratford Road. The ordnance business had been bought from Mulliner and Wigley by Charles Cammell, later Cammell Laird, in 1903. To this point Herbert Hall Mulliner (1861-1924) had continued as managing director, but after a long series of altercations with the Admiralty he was asked to resign, compensated, and replaced 3 February 1910 by the 46-year-old rear-admiral R H S Bacon who had been the Admiralty's Director of Naval Ordnance since August 1907. By early February with admiral Bacon on board and Mulliner off it the directors could report an order from the British Admiralty for the mountings of all the heavy guns of one of the latest battleships that brought into operation for the first time the most costly and most important part of the company's new plant ending a long difficult period for Coventry Ordnance Works.

In re this family: Herbert H. Mulliner was a scion of the rather famous family of coach and automobile builders of that name in Northampton, Birmingham, Leamington Spa, London and elsewhere in England. Though they started out in the coach business, they spread out into the production of scientific instruments and gun carriages, hence the factory in Coventry--automobiles and airplanes; and include one of the inventors of the pneumatic tire, Augustus G. Mulliner of Liverpool.

Herbert was the son of Henry Mulliner (1827-1887) and Ann (Robson) Mulliner (1831-??) of Leamington Spa, who was in turn, a son of Francis Mulliner (1789-1841) of Leamington Spa and Northampton. Henry published his book Carriage Builder's Tour in America in Leamington in 1883. Henry's Leamington Spa coach building business in Bedford Street and The Parade later had its carriage works in Packington Square and showroom in Chapel Street. Henry's second son Arthur Felton Mulliner (1859-1946) on Henry's death took over the family's Northampton business. (Note that the William Rice Mulliner, for whom the Mulliner Towers in Lagos, Nigeria were named was also a son of Francis and Ann.)

Herbert Hall Mulliner was b. March 1861, in Leamington Spa, Warks. He md. June 1899 in Lisburn, Antrim, Northern Ireland, to Adelaide Letitia Richardson (1870-1955, Ireland), by whom he had 3 daughters: Mary Evelyn Muriel Mulliner (1900 - 1982), Marjorie Rosamond Seton Mulliner (1902 - 1992) and Frances Helen Adelaide Mulliner (1909 - 1977). He d. 21 Apr 1924 in Flat 2, The Albany, Piccadilly, London.

Note: I wasn't able to trace the family back beyond Francis--though I may make a more concerted effort in future. It would be fascinating to determine where in the UK this family arose. Could they be related to my Mulliners, of Ipswich, Suffolk?


 

Mulliners Close

Birmingham, West Midlands, England
Contributed by: US332 Wayne Straight   |   19 Dec 2014

Mulliners Close in Birmingham is in the West Midlands region of England. The postcode is within the Chelmsley Wood ward/electoral division, which is in the constituency of Meriden. I strongly suspect that this small stretch of road was named after H.H. Mulliner.

THE COACHBUILDERS ENCYCLOPEDIA Mulliner & Co. (H.J.). The British Coachbuilding Mulliner family traces back to 1760, when the company was building coaches for the Royal Mail in Northampton.

There were at one time four separate companies trading with the name Mulliner, all seem to have descended from the original family:
- Arthur Mulliner based in Northampton.
- (Augusts G.?) Mulliner in Liverpool who also opened a showroom in Brook Street, Mayfair, London with Arthur Mulliner trading as Mulliner (London) Ltd.
- H.J. Mulliner who bought the Mayfair showroom.
- (H.H.) Mulliners of Birmingham. (Note: Parenthetical statements are mine - wjs)

Henry Jervis Mulliner founded H.J. Mulliner & Co. in 1900 in the Mayfair area of London where the factory was set up. This was probably the premises previously occupied by Mulliners (London) Ltd. The location was convenient as his clients, the nobility could afford his services. One of the early clients was C.S. Rolls who had a body built on a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost for his own use.

In 1906 the works moved out of Mayfair to Chiswick and shortly afterwards H.J. Mulliner sold his interest in the company to John Croall and retired. The family connection was maintained as Croall employed H. J. Mulliner's brother in law Frank Piesse to run the company.

Although H.J. Mulliner designed coachwork for C. S. Rolls' personal two-seater Silver Ghost roadster, it was not until 1928 that the firm began to regularly display its hand-crafted bodies on a Rolls-Royce chassis. From that year on, H.J. Mulliner always exhibited at least one Rolls-Royce chassis graced with their custom coachwork.

Following World War II, Mulliner was one of the few coachbuilders to resume building traditional, bespoke coachwork. By this time, the firm's reputation was such that it focused primarily on being a supplier to Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis, crafting the finest, high quality saloons, sedancas, limousines and dropheads for the world's wealthy and elite. By the 1950s, however, Mulliner moved away from the traditional wood-frame coachbuilding techniques of its past, turning instead to the more modern methods of its competitors using a "stressed skin" all-steel structure.

Rolls-Royce acquired Mulliner in 1959 and merged it with Park Ward which they had owned since 1939 forming Mulliner-Park Ward in 1961. This new entity can hardly be called a coachbuilder, because it was no longer an independant company and they were solely focussing on Rolls-Royce and Bentley.

Today, Mulliner is no more than the personal commissioning department for Bentley, turning the Mulliner name into nothing more than some sort of luxury badge for standard works cars with a personalized interior.

Additional information: http://www.coachbuild.com/index.php?option=com_gallery2&Itemid=50&g2_itemId=40892

See also http://tractors.wikia.com/wiki/Mulliners_of_Birmingham


 

Richard Molineux Stained Glass

152 Waterloo Rd., Uxbridge, Greater London UB8 2QX, England
Contributed by: US329 Jim Molineux   |   09 May 2015

Stained glass artist Richard Molineux has 20 years professional experience in London and the home counties. He uses an extensive range of technical and artistic skills to produce or restore beautiful windows that will stand the test of time.


 

The Molyneux

119 Molyneux Road, Kensington, LIVERPOOL, L6 6AJ
Contributed by: Paul Molyneux   |   20 May 2015

Here's a pub with a rather special name. It's in Kensington in Liverpool and although it looks very welcoming, I've never been. Sorry if you're all aware of it already - I only came across it the other day. Just zoom in and look at the sign.